Museums in Eindhoven

I am compiling a list of things to do while we are in The Netherlands over the Christmas break. While I’d prefer for the things to be FREE, I realize that unlike Ireland and Washington DC, most museums need to charge entrance fees – but some are free.

First up is the city of Eindhoven – being he closest “big” city to Boxtel, where we’ll stay, I figured we’d check it out.

It’s The Netherlands 5th largest city. There is a lot you can say about it, but charming & pretty it is not . This is due to the fact that it has been heavily bombarded during WWII leaving holes in the city and streets.  So this is why you will see a pretty house built next to an ugly 1960’s building. 

They have quite a few museums like Philips, PSV Eindhoven Football club, and an Art Museum.  But immediately I see that they have a museum for DAF trucks – Soren would enjoy that the most. 


DAF Museum


A museum dedicated to the DAF products sounds like a great place for Soren!  Eindhoven has been home to DAF, one of Europe’s largest truck manufacturers (and, at one time, cars), since the company’s founding in 1928. Started by brothers Hub and Wim Van Doorne in a small blacksmith’s shop, the company – short for Van Doorne’s Aanhangwagen Fabriek – started off making simple engineering products, gradually progressing from trailers to cars and trucks. The DAF Museum is a testament to the company’s success and includes a replica of the original workshops and offices, along with samples of its vehicles throughout the decades, including a number of prototypes.There is a village square, shops from the 1930’s, a pub, period garage and replica of the Van Doornes’ office as well as 120 DAF products including trucks, a special section to engines and cars some which were not even put into production.  There is a free kids treasure hunt included and in the end, if all correct they get a little present. 


Price is 9.00 per adult & 4.00 per children ages 5-15 (kids under 5 are FREE!)


Van Abbemuseum

The first public museum for modern & contemporary art in Europe.  The collection of around 2700 works of art include key works and archives by Lissitzky, Picasso!!, Kokoschka, Daniels & Kormeling.  

To keep the kids entertained they have a character called Beetle Kusa which lives in the museum and loves doing magic.  Every night he practices new spells and tricks like making paintings dance and sculptures sing.  But one night, he magically swirled itself upside down and can’t figure out the words to the spell to help him get back on its wheels.  He kids can help by completing the spell.  A book at the counter is a small suitcase filled with info to find all the clues in the collection & exhibition. 

Price is 12.00 per adult & children under 13 are FREE



Philips Museum

This one looks the coolest to me.   Mission Eureka is an innovative group game about more than 100 years of Philips inventions. It is suitable for everyone aged 8 years and upwards. You play Mission Eureka on an iPad, in a team of 2, 3 or 4 persons. You will be presented with challenges that you have to solve, just like real researchers. Working together as a team, you’ll discover how LED light works and what X-rays do, for example.

Team members compete against one another and against other teams in the museum. Mission Eureka is an exciting adventure that will bring out the explorer in you!  
Mission Eureka takes approximately 60 minutes and can be played in Dutch, English, French or Spanish. Price €5.00 per iPad / max. 4 people.  Not sure if they give you an ipad or you have to bring one – probably the later – yet another reason I need an iPad 🙂

Price is 8.00 per adult & children over 6 are 4.00.  Prices going up by .50 in January 2017
Family ticket is 
25.00 (2 adults & 2 kids and includes 1 Mission Eureka game


Eindhoven has a lot of street art.  The prime location to find it is De Berenkuil an area near the Eindhoven University  of Technology.  It has been designated a free zone for graffiti artists.  Also along the back of the Van Abbemuseum.

There is a card which gives you free enterance to loads of museums in NL. If I knew we come often now that Nils’ father lives back here then I might get it. The savings are significant.

The Museum card (Dutch: “Museumkaart”) is a personal card that allows free entrance to about 400 museums in the Netherlands.[2] As of 2016, the card costs €59.90 (including €4.95 administrative expenses) for adults, and is valid for one year.[3] A discounted card is available for youth under age 19, costing €32.45 (including €4.95 administrative expenses).

The Museum card is available at many of the larger participating museums, and it can also be purchased online. Museumkaart holders may register to receive a monthly digital magazine Museumkaart exclusive offers.

Although most museums offer free entry to Museumkaart holders, some museums charge a small fee. Additionally, some museums charge an additional fee for special exhibitions but not to the general collection.

The Museumkaart aims to promote the repeat visits and to increase the bond between museums and their (potential) visitors. The (Dutch) Museum Association is the publisher of the Museumkaart. The operation of the card is housed in the Museum Card Foundation (SMK), which also organizes the Museum Weekend and supports the marketing of affiliated museums. The income of the Museumkaart foundation benefits the participating museums. Affiliated museums are recognized in the Dutch Museum Register and are members of the Dutch Museum Association.

 

 The Museumkaart is available to buy at many of the participating museums below. It is noteworthy that the main web page of the Museumkaart is available in Dutch only and it does not provide any translation (see http://www.museumkaart.nl/).

In Amsterdam, the participating museums are as follows. Many of these museums are part of the Official Museums of Amsterdam, including the Cobra Museum (located in Amstelveen) and the Zaans Museum (located in Zaandam).

Rotterdam

Utrecht

The Hague

Haarlem

Leiden

Leeuwarden

In other parts of the Netherlands:

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